Posts

Yes, White-Tailed Deer Populations Should Be Managed

Gray wolf, apex predator/National Park Service As a non-hunting, vegetarian nature-lover I am in favor of deer. My heart lifts when I see a doe and fawn browsing in the green dappled light of early summer in Thatcher Woods. I marvel at their ability to move quickly through the trees and to seemingly appear and disappear at will. Yet I believe that deer herds should be managed so that their population will fit the available habitat.  In the natural, food-webby scheme of things, deer, as herbivores, are prey animals with high reproductive rates and a need for large areas full of the plants that nourish them. Over the past million years they’ve co-evolved with their predators; until the 19th century, deer roamed widely, their populations kept in balance by the wolves and Native peoples who depended on them for sustenance. Wolves took what they needed and left the rest for scavengers such as coyotes and crows. Humans used nearly every part of the deer–meat, hide, hooves, bones, and antlers

Native Gardens through the Seasons: A Virtual Walk

The Beauty of Thoughtful Neglect: Spring Garden Care in the Ecological Garden

Free Webinar: Native Bees in the Garden

Carbon Gardening: A Podcast at Growing Greener

Early Spring Notes: Life in the Garden During a Risky Time

Carbon Gardening: A Natural Climate Solution that Can Help Reduce CO2 Emissions While Restoring Biodiversity

Gardening as a Political Act of Necessary Beauty

Native Shrubs and Why They're Essential for Carbon Sequestration

Free Webinar: Healthy Soil, Native Plants and Backyard Carbon Sequestration

My Great-Great-Grandfather, a City Park and Some Monarch Butterflies

A Nearly Infinitely Adaptable Recipe for Ecological Regeneration and Soil Carbon Sequestration