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Native Shrubs and Why They're Essential for Carbon Sequestration

“Shrubbiness is such a remarkable adaptive design that one may wonder why more plants have not adopted it.” (H. C. Stutz, 1989)

In light of the newest IPCC and US climate change reports, coupled with reports of the ongoing declines of wild species—birds, insects—you name them, just so long as they aren’t human, I have turned to thinking about shrubs. It is precisely their adaptive characteristics that give shrubs their potential to be powerful players in soil carbon sequestration and ecosystem regeneration in certain parts of the world, such as the Midwest.

Although alarming, the reports are not surprising to anyone who’s been keeping track. The IPCC report says human global society has 12 years to reduce carbon emissions to 45% below 2010 levels if there is to be any hope of holding overall average global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees C (2.7 degrees F). The US report, searchable by region, adds fairly detailed, equally dire scenarios for this country. No place on earth will be immu…

Free Webinar: Healthy Soil, Native Plants and Backyard Carbon Sequestration

My Great-Great-Grandfather, a City Park and Some Monarch Butterflies

A Nearly Infinitely Adaptable Recipe for Ecological Regeneration and Soil Carbon Sequestration

A View from the Air: Carbon Sequestration, Midwestern Farms and Biodiversity

Will Carbon Sequestration Redeem the Lawn?

Constructing Hope: A Discussion of "Green Earth"