Two Bur Oaks and a Crawdad

A group of swamp white oaks Healthy soil is important, but for whom?  In the Garden  The young bur oak would not be kept down. Yet again it revealed itself among the standing dead stalks of a large patch of purple bee balm, a good three feet tall and leafing out. In spring, a bur oak’s leaves look like sharp-edged, glossy cutouts. They are not green, but shade delicately among soft corals, tans and pinks. The green comes a bit later, like a slow-motion wave gently pervading each leathery leaf. The question, as it had been for several years, was what to do with this young newcomer to the garden.  About ten feet away and across the walk from house to garage stands a second bur oak that I’d started from an acorn some twelve years ago. I’ve enjoyed watching it grow its first sets of true leaves, become large enough to attract birds and then mature enough to bear acorns. This winter I limbed it up three feet from the ground, mainly to give the sedges and wild geraniums growing underneath a

Free Webinar: Native Bees in the Garden




I'll be talking about native bees from a gardener's perspective online Sunday, June 14 at 2:30 pm CDT. Excited to be part of West Cook Wild Ones' series of monthly talks! 

Did you know that the Chicago area has some 480 species of native bees? Many of these species are understudied and some appear to be in decline. Research shows, however, that urban areas can be a great refuge for them. Come and learn about the fascinating biology and life cycles of native bees and how you can provide habitat in your garden. 


 



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