Two Bur Oaks and a Crawdad

A group of swamp white oaks Healthy soil is important, but for whom?  In the Garden  The young bur oak would not be kept down. Yet again it revealed itself among the standing dead stalks of a large patch of purple bee balm, a good three feet tall and leafing out. In spring, a bur oak’s leaves look like sharp-edged, glossy cutouts. They are not green, but shade delicately among soft corals, tans and pinks. The green comes a bit later, like a slow-motion wave gently pervading each leathery leaf. The question, as it had been for several years, was what to do with this young newcomer to the garden.  About ten feet away and across the walk from house to garage stands a second bur oak that I’d started from an acorn some twelve years ago. I’ve enjoyed watching it grow its first sets of true leaves, become large enough to attract birds and then mature enough to bear acorns. This winter I limbed it up three feet from the ground, mainly to give the sedges and wild geraniums growing underneath a

Garlic Mustard Update

Today in the woods I discovered several garlic mustard plants with the telltale holes in the leaves that indicate insect munchers, and several others that appeared to have some sort of fungal disease. Perhaps some sort of shift is beginning, so they'll eventually settle into the ecosystem?

Comments

Diana Studer said…
When I was carefully ripping out Paterson's Curse, I found a tiny caterpillar. Now what, do I leave a few?
Hmmm. What is Paterson's Curse? I'll have to go look that up.

I was just interested to see these signs on the garlic mustard because so far, biologists haven't found any biological controls that would keep it in check. I did leave those particular plants and will probably go back in a couple of days and look at them again.
Anonymous said…
The whole garlic mustard issue is very interesting. If enough people start loving garlic mustard pesto,that could help. Re: Asian carp: noticed an article about a Chicago chef who is serving a ceviche made of that fish, and his customers liked it. :et's hope lots of chefs will follow that lead.
Good job on awareness raising.
M.