Two Bur Oaks and a Crawdad

A group of swamp white oaks Healthy soil is important, but for whom?  In the Garden  The young bur oak would not be kept down. Yet again it revealed itself among the standing dead stalks of a large patch of purple bee balm, a good three feet tall and leafing out. In spring, a bur oak’s leaves look like sharp-edged, glossy cutouts. They are not green, but shade delicately among soft corals, tans and pinks. The green comes a bit later, like a slow-motion wave gently pervading each leathery leaf. The question, as it had been for several years, was what to do with this young newcomer to the garden.  About ten feet away and across the walk from house to garage stands a second bur oak that I’d started from an acorn some twelve years ago. I’ve enjoyed watching it grow its first sets of true leaves, become large enough to attract birds and then mature enough to bear acorns. This winter I limbed it up three feet from the ground, mainly to give the sedges and wild geraniums growing underneath a

Bloom Day

I've noticed many garden bloggers post what's blooming on the 15th of the month. Until now I had always associated Bloom day, or Bloomsday, with June 16, 1904, the date when James Joyce's Leopold Bloom set off on his adventures around Dublin in Ulysses. Joyce lovers everywhere celebrate that day with parties at which they read selections aloud. Is there a connection?

Anyway, here's what's blooming in my yard at the moment:
Exotics include tulips, Vinca minor, Iberis, dwarf irises, bleeding hearts, Brunnera 'Jack Frost,' dandelions, creeping charlie, and Norway maple. Natives include celandine poppies, wild ginger, violets, prairie phlox, Virginia bluebells, and serviceberry. A few other things, such as the lilacs, are about to pop and will be done before the next bloom day. So perhaps these lists should be posted every two weeks.

I'm not much of a photographer, but my friend Joe took these pictures of
what was blooming in Thatcher Woods on April 10 and shared them with me. At left are spring beauties (Claytonia virginica) and bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis), at right is trout lily (Erythronium americanum).



Comments

All the blooms in your pictures are so simple, but so elegant. It's interesting to learn that your lilac is about to bloom. Our area is warmer, but my lilac' blooms are far behind.
Some bloggers post their blooms every friday. Tootsie at Tootsie Time hosts that meme. Katarina at Roses and Stuff used to host Blooming Friday, but it looks like she decided to end it.
Thank you so much for your comments on my blog! My husband asked me why I posted war pictures on the garden blog. How to explain that if that war ended differently I wouldn't have a garden, and there wouldn't be me. Most people prefer to think only about nice things. Thanks again!
Anonymous said…
Dear Adrian, What a fascinating fact about Bloomsday which had my imagination working overtime of gatherings in Ireland and beyond in celebration of James Joyce's epic work.

I do so love white flowers and your elegant selection was, in my eyes, absolutely perfect.

Thank you for your generous comment to my latest posting to which I have replied.
Hi Tatyana,

That is interesting about the lilacs. Mostly we in Illinois suffer gardener's envy when viewing pictures from warmer climes. I, too, think it's important to try to understand history.
Hi Edith Hope,

Thanks for visiting. I too, love white flowers and hope to visit Sissinghurst some day.
Autumn Belle said…
The blooms your featured today are pretty and sweet. Happy GBBD!
Anonymous said…
Hi, Adrian.
Thanks for the blog, and I look forward to more visits to your garden as it grows. And the Bloomsday reminder, which brought up happy reminders of the perfect sunny days we enjoyed in Ireland.
MRG
Autumn Belle, Thanks for stopping by. Joe does take good pictures, doesn't he?

MRG, I imagine Ireland must be beautiful in June.
love the lovely trout lilly. I have leaves but never a bloom 3 years now. Nellie
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