Dear Mr. Paulson, Re Your Recent NY Times Op-Ed about Mass Extinction

10/4/21  Dear Mr. Paulson,  You arguably are one of the most powerful, famous, and networked men in the world, with many important accomplishments. I am the completely ordinary, middle class, volunteer steward of 53 acres of publicly owned, remnant floodplain woodland situated on the banks of the Des Plaines River. Based on your eponymously named Institute’s website, you apparently spend much of your time as a “thought leader” working to somehow combine free-market growth with the urgent necessity to mitigate carbon emissions and save biodiversity, while I spend many days studying, thinking about, and working, hands-on, to protect and increase the biodiversity of this small patch of actual land. For example, this very morning, before breakfast, before I was aware of your op-ed in the New York Times discussing solutions to the epochal, mass extinction event humanity is causing, I read a report about the likely effects of climate change in Illinois, including the poor adaptation prospec

The Three Best Things to Do for Birds in Your Backyard


Today I went to a presentation by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service given at a Chicago Wilderness meeting downtown. The service is forming what it calls Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) that will "comprise a seamless national network supporting landscapes capable of sustaining abundant, diverse and healthy populations of fish wildlife and plants."

Here in the Great Lakes region we already have cooperative entities such as the Great Lakes Initiative and Chicago Wilderness, so for many in the conservation community, LCCs seem like a logical development. The idea is that they would act as a sort of science clearinghouse, aiding and helping to coordinate across state boundaries the efforts of public and private conservation organizations.

We gardeners have a part to play in this: migrating birds, for example, don't distinguish between public lands and private gardens when they are looking for a place to rest. According to the presenter, with whom I spoke after the talk, many suburban yards, dominated by grass and trees, serve as "death traps" (his words) because they look green and leafy, but there aren't enough mid-level shrubs to serve as cover, nesting areas or food sources for birds.

Hence the three best things you can do for birds in your backyard:
  1. Don't use insecticides or pesticides. Birds, especially when nesting, eat insects and feed them to their young. In fact about 90 percent of their diet can be insects. A gardener who uses insecticides is actively discouraging birds from nesting--and potentially starving baby birds.

  2. Plant native bushes that produce berries and don't over-prune. Your standard barberry, boxwood or privet just doesn't cut it when compared to native Viburnams such as arrowwood (V. dentatum), nannyberry (V. lentago), American cranberry bush (V. trilobum), or blackhaw (V. prunifolium). Asian viburnums, while lovely, don't fit the complete ecosystem as well. Other bird favorites include chokeberries (Aronia species), serviceberries (Amelanchier species), and native dogwoods, especially pagoda dogwood (Cornus alternifolia). To see a list of birds that eat viburnum berries, go to Illinois Wildflowers.
  3. Plant seed-bearing native flowers such as coneflowers (Echinacea species) and bee balm (Monarda species). And don't cut them down until spring so birds can eat the seeds.
Don't let your yard be a beautiful death trap!

Comments

Dave Coulter said…
Excellent advice. Now I just need a yard :)
Kathy Green said…
Hi Adrian, I like your new blog. This post has great tips for anyone concerned about taking care of the birds in their ecosystem. Also, thanks for visiting my blog Gardening for Nature, and I'm not sure why your blog link didn't work. Kathy
Diana Studer said…
We have a bietou daisy bush. Planted by birds in the first garden. And brought to this second garden as a cutting.
Gardening Angel and Elephant's Eye, thanks for stopping by. I'm learning so much from visiting blogs around the States and around the world. Now I'll have to look up bietou daisy bush. It sounds like it must be pretty.